College of Forestry News

Oregon State University’s College of Forestry is hosting two information sessions for the public regarding OSU’s 10 research forests and the creation of new individual forest management plans to guide the future of those tracts.

Even though we’ve had a mild summer, conifers in Oregon are still getting hit hard by several years of drought, to the point that many are dying.

The Oregon State University College of Forestry is inviting the public to participate in discussions regarding the Elliott State Forest next month in North Bend, Reedsport and Roseburg.

Founded by OSU forestry professor T. J. Starker in 1936, Starker Forests now holds more than 87,000 acres of timberland in five Western Oregon counties, and Blanchard has lived through much of the company’s history.

Assistant professor Ben Leshchinsky and collaborators report unstable slopes on Oregon’s coastline could see a 30 percent jump in landslide movements if extreme storms become frequent enough to increase seacliff erosion by 10 percent.

Tammy Cushing

Next year, Tammy Cushing, an Extension forest business specialist at Oregon State University, will become the third woman to serve as president of the largest professional society of foresters in the world.

The annual Starker Lecture Series at Oregon State University will this year focus on tribal forestry with a film, three lectures and a capstone field trip.

Elliot forest

Anthony Davis, interim dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, was interviewed on OPB's Think Out Loud about what the Elliott State Forest could bring to the college as a research forest.

Swiss Needle Cast

The epidemic of Swiss needle cast on the wet and foggy west slope of the Oregon Coast Range has intensified as recent climate trends make the environment friendlier to the fungal disease that hits Douglas-fir, the most important timber species in the Pacific Northwest.

Christopher Dunn

“We’re still digging in our heels like we always have and we’re just going after it more and more and more, rather than backing off and taking a different assessment,” said Chris Dunn, who studies fire at Oregon State University.